Falling off the Dieting Wagon

#21
I think motivation and ones psychological and emotional temperament are big factors in dieting. Whenever a person dieting becomes emotionally disturbed or problematic then slip ups usually happen, this is the same when one is trying to quit smoking or drinking. OMAD diet would be easier in a controlled environment rather than in an open environment.
Exactly its all in the mind. Just like the author implied. My way of thinking it is if you think that you are beaten thrn you are down but if you feel like you will win somehow someway you will find the strength to push on. The body we desire for is just a couple of hurdles away.
 
#22
Exactly its all in the mind. Just like the author implied. My way of thinking it is if you think that you are beaten thrn you are down but if you feel like you will win somehow someway you will find the strength to push on. The body we desire for is just a couple of hurdles away.
Right, it's about your perception of things and what you believe in. If you think that what you're doing is good for you and could help you in achieving your goals then nothing is impossible. Faith is the key to focus and Determination is the key to success.
 
#23
I am like this...before. Once I got to eat tons of calories, I feel like I'm giving up just like kids when playing chutes and ladders. I felt like as if I don't have any chance at all so the result was, I just continue to eat more and have no motivation to workout.. I do have a lot of failures when it comes to losing weight. It's really hard for me to do it before but now? I can't keep myself thinking of exercise and work out. I am consciously looking at my body at the mirror and ask myself, "Is this enough? No! you need to work more hard" That's the first thing I do every morning. To motivate myself. I also thought of things about harsh words thrown at me by my friends and cousins before when I as still obese. I find it really annoying that I want to push more hard.
Wow your story is quite touching and all too familiar to me. However for myself I set weekly targets based on wejght and not by looking at the mirror. I get to evaluate my weight at the end of the week and compare to the target I had set for myself. If it has not been reached then I work twice as hard to recover that and for the current week in the week that follows.
 
#24
Wow your story is quite touching and all too familiar to me. However for myself I set weekly targets based on wejght and not by looking at the mirror. I get to evaluate my weight at the end of the week and compare to the target I had set for myself. If it has not been reached then I work twice as hard to recover that and for the current week in the week that follows.
Ah well that's still a nice way, we actually have different methods but what's more important is that we work hard for losing weight. I don't know, I just find it more effective for me like check my body on the mirror if this weight is okay or not. Sometimes I check my clothes if I can wear those small clothes of mine before. Some how I am like you, sometimes I do cheat days so basically if I see myself getting back again, I have to double up my work out but I check my body like almost everyday.
 
#25
What comes in my mind after reading this is what I always tell all my friends that are into dieting, it is that DIETING is not an easy process or habit. You should atleast know your goal and have a perfect reason why you are doing it. Without it you will always fall on your slip. Some people do diet just for a trip. And they will really not going to get a long shot for that. They will easily stop because ibviusly they don't have goal to be focus on.
 
#26
Ah well that's still a nice way, we actually have different methods but what's more important is that we work hard for losing weight. I don't know, I just find it more effective for me like check my body on the mirror if this weight is okay or not. Sometimes I check my clothes if I can wear those small clothes of mine before. Some how I am like you, sometimes I do cheat days so basically if I see myself getting back again, I have to double up my work out but I check my body like almost everyday.
Wow nice. That is a quite a method you have over there theough about using clothes. Cheat days are important to have some evaluation and really know how close you are to the goals you had set. I think that the effectiveness you have may be from the daily focus you have in checking yourself and noticing all minor issues.
 
#27
Wow nice. That is a quite a method you have over there theough about using clothes. Cheat days are important to have some evaluation and really know how close you are to the goals you had set. I think that the effectiveness you have may be from the daily focus you have in checking yourself and noticing all minor issues.
Yes, indeed. I just want to motivate myself actually so focus is really important. Let's just be focus on work outs and diet plan or the omad but you can still give yourself a break for you not to be exhausted because too much is also bad. Just like in the topic above, the main focus there is to reach the highest spot. Fails to reach the first is not a failure, we just need break and get back on track again. You may not be the first but what's important is you tried and you able to achieve it.
 
#28
Excellent post. Thank you! Getting back on track after a 'slip up' was difficult for me. And, this prevented me from achieving my weight loss goals. I am learning to shake if off and moving forward with my OMAD lifestyle!!!

Thanks for the post!!!
 
#29
Falling Off The Diet Wagon

by Jonathan Bowden, M. A.

"One of the most discouraging aspects of weight loss are the inevitable slips. Everyone has them. For some people, an occasional slip engenders an all out binge...followed by guilt, self-recrimination, a sense of powerlessness, and a feeling of "What's the use?"

Sound familiar?

I call it "falling off the diet wagon," and if you can change how you think about it, you don't need to be victimized by it anymore.

Let's start by looking at a simple children's game called "Chutes and Ladders." Here is how it works: you use a spinner to advance from space to space toward the winner's spot. Along the way there are ladders-which leapfrog you over a lot of spaces-as well as chutes-which send you back in the opposite direction.


Some kids play this game with a laissez-faire, "whatever" attitude, taking life as it comes with all its ups and downs, pitfalls and triumphs. They learn the wonderful moral of Chutes and Ladders-half the secret of life is just showing up. Keep playing the game, and eventually you will get where you are going.

Some kids, however, get very upset when they land on a chute. They are ready to quit the game, pick up their proverbial marbles and go home. For some reason, they believe that life isn't supposed to have any chutes. When they land on them, they are very disappointed and feel like giving up.

Weight loss is like a huge game of Chutes and Ladders.

In dealing with hundreds of clients over the years, I've discovered that the biggest difference between the winners and the losers in the weight loss war isn't whether or not people have "slips" and go off their program. It's not really a question of "if" they have them, it is a question of "when."

What really makes the difference is how you deal with the slips when they happen.

Here's an example. You have been absolutely wonderful on your plan for three weeks. You've been sticking to your exercise routine and feeling pretty terrific. You go to your best friend's wedding and have a glass of wine. Before you know it, someone is insisting that you try those delicious little canapes, and before the wedding singer can say "Tanta Elka Cuts The Cake," you've managed to down about 4,000 calories from stuff you wouldn't have been caught dead looking at during the past few weeks...pates, desserts, breads, stuffings, you name it.

Most people think that's where the action stops. Actually, it's where the real action begins.

First, a reality check. Have you done a lot of damage? Not really. You may have put on a pound or two. Big deal. You can knock it off in no time, and go right back to work on yourself.

So what's the problem?

The problem isn't what we did, but what we make it "mean." We tell ourselves that our "transgression" means that we have no will power, that we will never succeed, that our efforts are in vain.

Let me suggest something more empowering.

Suppose, instead, that we learn to see life's occasional "chutes" as just that-stumbling blocks that everyone hits on their personal path to personal power, nothing to be afraid of and certainly nothing to give a lot of meaning to.

So you had a chute. On your next spin you might hit a ladder.

Most important of all, you can't win the game unless you keep on playing.

And every minute gives you a new chance for another spin. Take it.

And don't look back.
Sounds good. I'm going to try to tell myself this. Certainly I won't get where I need to go if I quit.
 
#30
Take it as small baby steps or learning to drive a car for the first time, you wouldn't drive on the motorway straight away. So start by seeing how you can go for 3 hours, then progress check and then try another three hours until you've reached dinner time (Hour window) and then start counting again, you could set up counting app on your mobile as you do for cigarettes,
 
#32
I wondered what was in this forum, and wow, this was the first thread i clicked, and it's really good motivation! Using a children's game to make people like me realize how simple it is to get motivated and inspired is genius! Thank you.
 
#33
This is very inspirational thank you. This game is very much like snake and ladders when I was younger. And I suppose I could liken them to my pitfalls in diet as snakes are associated with temptations (pun intended). But like you said, we just have to keep playing and we'll eventually get there. And actually we have the advantage here because we don't just hold the dice or the spinner. We control them. Thus we could choose our steps in order not to fall on those very same snakes or chutes that would cause our failure. We can be in control.
 
#34
I think everyone experiences slip offs. I also experienced it once when me and my boyfriend got attracted on different delicious foods we saw in facebook. We can't resist our cravings and slipped off our diet. At first I told to myself that maybe I can't do it anymore but thanks to my boyfriend, he inspired me again to get back and keep dedicated towards our goal on losing weight together.
 
#35
The most important thing that one who undergoes diet, particularly those who are into OMAD or One Meal A Day Diet, must have is the DISCIPLINE. It is given that it will be hard at first but, eventually, will be use to it. You should avoid yourself from temptation. As much as possible try to avaoid foods that might destroy your OMAD routine. At the end of the day, it all boils to our sincerity and determination to have a healthier body and life.
 
#36
Falling Off The Diet Wagon

by Jonathan Bowden, M. A.

"One of the most discouraging aspects of weight loss are the inevitable slips. Everyone has them. For some people, an occasional slip engenders an all out binge...followed by guilt, self-recrimination, a sense of powerlessness, and a feeling of "What's the use?"

Sound familiar?

I call it "falling off the diet wagon," and if you can change how you think about it, you don't need to be victimized by it anymore.

Let's start by looking at a simple children's game called "Chutes and Ladders." Here is how it works: you use a spinner to advance from space to space toward the winner's spot. Along the way there are ladders-which leapfrog you over a lot of spaces-as well as chutes-which send you back in the opposite direction.


Some kids play this game with a laissez-faire, "whatever" attitude, taking life as it comes with all its ups and downs, pitfalls and triumphs. They learn the wonderful moral of Chutes and Ladders-half the secret of life is just showing up. Keep playing the game, and eventually you will get where you are going.

Some kids, however, get very upset when they land on a chute. They are ready to quit the game, pick up their proverbial marbles and go home. For some reason, they believe that life isn't supposed to have any chutes. When they land on them, they are very disappointed and feel like giving up.

Weight loss is like a huge game of Chutes and Ladders.

In dealing with hundreds of clients over the years, I've discovered that the biggest difference between the winners and the losers in the weight loss war isn't whether or not people have "slips" and go off their program. It's not really a question of "if" they have them, it is a question of "when."

What really makes the difference is how you deal with the slips when they happen.

Here's an example. You have been absolutely wonderful on your plan for three weeks. You've been sticking to your exercise routine and feeling pretty terrific. You go to your best friend's wedding and have a glass of wine. Before you know it, someone is insisting that you try those delicious little canapes, and before the wedding singer can say "Tanta Elka Cuts The Cake," you've managed to down about 4,000 calories from stuff you wouldn't have been caught dead looking at during the past few weeks...pates, desserts, breads, stuffings, you name it.

Most people think that's where the action stops. Actually, it's where the real action begins.

First, a reality check. Have you done a lot of damage? Not really. You may have put on a pound or two. Big deal. You can knock it off in no time, and go right back to work on yourself.

So what's the problem?

The problem isn't what we did, but what we make it "mean." We tell ourselves that our "transgression" means that we have no will power, that we will never succeed, that our efforts are in vain.

Let me suggest something more empowering.

Suppose, instead, that we learn to see life's occasional "chutes" as just that-stumbling blocks that everyone hits on their personal path to personal power, nothing to be afraid of and certainly nothing to give a lot of meaning to.

So you had a chute. On your next spin you might hit a ladder.

Most important of all, you can't win the game unless you keep on playing.

And every minute gives you a new chance for another spin. Take it.

And don't look back.
True. It is normal to have slips but the problem is when you stop. Take it one step at a time and just continue onwards. I have experienced this too not only in dieting but in everything in our life. I admit that when I fall off the dieting wagon I ended up becoming guilty. Before I always blame myself every time and I lose the motivation to do it. But now, I learned to just go on and learn from experience.
 
#37
Falling Off The Diet Wagon

by Jonathan Bowden, M. A.

"One of the most discouraging aspects of weight loss are the inevitable slips. Everyone has them. For some people, an occasional slip engenders an all out binge...followed by guilt, self-recrimination, a sense of powerlessness, and a feeling of "What's the use?"

Sound familiar?

I call it "falling off the diet wagon," and if you can change how you think about it, you don't need to be victimized by it anymore.

Let's start by looking at a simple children's game called "Chutes and Ladders." Here is how it works: you use a spinner to advance from space to space toward the winner's spot. Along the way there are ladders-which leapfrog you over a lot of spaces-as well as chutes-which send you back in the opposite direction.


Some kids play this game with a laissez-faire, "whatever" attitude, taking life as it comes with all its ups and downs, pitfalls and triumphs. They learn the wonderful moral of Chutes and Ladders-half the secret of life is just showing up. Keep playing the game, and eventually you will get where you are going.

Some kids, however, get very upset when they land on a chute. They are ready to quit the game, pick up their proverbial marbles and go home. For some reason, they believe that life isn't supposed to have any chutes. When they land on them, they are very disappointed and feel like giving up.

Weight loss is like a huge game of Chutes and Ladders.

In dealing with hundreds of clients over the years, I've discovered that the biggest difference between the winners and the losers in the weight loss war isn't whether or not people have "slips" and go off their program. It's not really a question of "if" they have them, it is a question of "when."

What really makes the difference is how you deal with the slips when they happen.

Here's an example. You have been absolutely wonderful on your plan for three weeks. You've been sticking to your exercise routine and feeling pretty terrific. You go to your best friend's wedding and have a glass of wine. Before you know it, someone is insisting that you try those delicious little canapes, and before the wedding singer can say "Tanta Elka Cuts The Cake," you've managed to down about 4,000 calories from stuff you wouldn't have been caught dead looking at during the past few weeks...pates, desserts, breads, stuffings, you name it.

Most people think that's where the action stops. Actually, it's where the real action begins.

First, a reality check. Have you done a lot of damage? Not really. You may have put on a pound or two. Big deal. You can knock it off in no time, and go right back to work on yourself.

So what's the problem?

The problem isn't what we did, but what we make it "mean." We tell ourselves that our "transgression" means that we have no will power, that we will never succeed, that our efforts are in vain.

Let me suggest something more empowering.

Suppose, instead, that we learn to see life's occasional "chutes" as just that-stumbling blocks that everyone hits on their personal path to personal power, nothing to be afraid of and certainly nothing to give a lot of meaning to.

So you had a chute. On your next spin you might hit a ladder.

Most important of all, you can't win the game unless you keep on playing.

And every minute gives you a new chance for another spin. Take it.

And don't look back.
This is a fabulous read and reminder! Thanks very much!
 

Happyflowerlady

Moderator
Staff member
#39
This is a fabulous read and reminder! Thanks very much!
I think that for me, the whole lifestyle of intermittent fasting and OMAD, is an on and off again thing. Most of the time, I have my OMAD around 11-3, depending on my schedule each day; but when that does not work, I have 2 meals, one regular one and then a snack .
I always try to have my last meal no later than 4PM, so I can be fasting overnight.
 
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